Home Entertainment

 

Video Games Los Angeles CA

The sophistication of the latest video game consoles and the vast selection of video games for every genre, age and style have led to a new revolution. Gaming geeks were on to something powerful and their interest spurred advances in entertainment and gaming software that created the demand for top of the line gaming computers and consoles such as the Xbox 360, PS3 and Nintendo Wii. Video game controllers weren’t left behind and the Wii remote controller and PS3 motion controller give audiences a virtual experience like no other controllers have done before. There are a multitude of video game accessories for video games such as the popular Guitar Hero and Rock Band. You can even take your gaming experience mobile with the multimedia PSP and Nintendo DS Lite. Don’t get left behind and find the video game consoles and video games that are right for you. Please scroll down for more information and access to the home electronics stores and video game retailers in Los Angeles, CA listed below.

Game Stop
(213) 382-6998
3183 Wilshire Blvd
Los Angeles, CA
Hours
Mon-Sat 10am-9pm
Sun 11am-6pm

Game Stop
(323) 938-1317
7160 W. Beverly Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA
Hours
Mon-Sat 10am-8pm
Sun 11am-6pm

Game Stop
(310) 204-5809
3855 Overland Avenue
Culver City, CA
Hours
Mon-Sat 10am-8pm
Sun 11am-6pm

Game Stop
(323) 263-0898
3476 Whittier Blvdunit 104 And 105
Los Angeles, CA
Hours
Mon-Sat 10am-8pm
Sun 11am-6pm

Gamestop - Mall
(310) 390-2919
6000 Sepulveda Blvdste 1521
Culver City, CA
Hours
Mon-Sat 10am-9pm
Sun 11am-7pm

Gamestop - Mall
(323) 293-7560
3650 W Martin Luther King Blvdste 274
Los Angeles, CA
Hours
Mon-Sat 10am-9pm
Sun 11am-6pm

Game Stop
(323) 464-8349
1509 Vine St
Los Angeles, CA
Hours
Mon-Sat 10am-8pm
Sun 11am-6pm

Game Stop
(323) 588-1578
1401 E Gage Aveste B
Los Angeles, CA
Hours
Mon-Sat 10am-7pm
Sun 11am-6pm

Game Stop
(323) 299-0987
1810 W Slauson Ave
Los Angeles, CA
Hours
Mon-Sat 10am-8pm
Sun 11am-6pm

Game Stop
(323) 585-6690
2104 E Florence Ave
Huntington Park, CA
Hours
Mon-Sat 10am-9pm
Sun 11am-6pm

Video Games

Provided By:

December 1, 2005 By Scott Wasser

Ready for another rousing round of Donkey Kong, I dig the game cartridge from a box and pull the Nintendo Entertainment System out of the closet. Then the console goes onto the coffee table. Its power cord must reach the wall, its A/V cable the television, and its wired controllers the couch. This means moving the coffee table 7 inches closer to my 25-inch Zenith.

With the console in place and the Donkey Kong cartridge in its slot, I pull out an RF converter/adapter to link the Nintendo system to the Zenith’s antenna input. Squeezing between the wall and the television stand, I grope behind the Zenith with one hand, contort my body and my other arm like a Cirque du Soleil acrobat, and make the connection.

That was 20 years ago. Today, controllers are wireless and RF adapters are as scarce as suits and ties are at a beach volleyball contest. Sure, plenty of Sony PlayStations still perch precariously on coffee tables, but video game consoles and PCs are increasingly becoming integral components in home theaters, not mere toys to be dragged out of a closet for a few hours of playtime.

Making Gaming Better
Clockwise from upper left: Voodoo PC’s Aria media center PC in its bright-red, home-theater-friendly chassis; Sony’s EyeToy video game camera system for PlayStation 2; Gyration’s wireless mouse, which works without a hard surface; and Monster Cable’s premium-quality component video/stereo audio cable for Xbox. (Click images to enlarge)
“We set up gaming for every home theater we put in,” says Marilyn Sanford, president of Vancouver, British Columbia, custom installer La Scala. “We really believe that gaming is a fundamental growth area for entertainment in the home.”

Rich Green, founder of Palo Alto, Calif., custom installer Rich Green Ink, takes it a step further. “Gaming is the future of our industry,” says Green who, like Sanford, is a member of the Custom Electronic Design and Installation Association (CEDIA) board of directors and its Certification Council chairman. Even ultra-high-end audio/video equipment maker Goldmund agrees: “Video games are now installed in most of our systems,” says company president Michel Reverchon. “Not so much for the person who buys the system, but so other family members can enjoy the system, too.”

While Green strongly believes that a dedicated gaming room is the best choice for most families, he concedes that, “You can effectively combine gaming into a home theater environment.” After consulting with Green and others in the home entertainment and gaming industries, we developed a seven-step to-do list for introducing video games into your home theater.Select Your Screen
Any television technology works fine for gaming, although Green warns that flat-panel LCDs can have a hard time handling fast-motion games if their pixel refresh rate is too slow. He recommends refresh rates of 16 milliseconds or faster. Sanford, meanwhile, warns...

Click here to read more from Home Entertainment