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Wireless HDMI Atlanta GA

Wireless streaming video isn’t new, but it has been wrought with images that stutter, lose sync with the audio, or disappear altogether. Understandably most people wouldn’t put up with this. So companies who have been slow to step in with solutions for standard resolution video are even more wary now when it comes to streaming high-def.

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Wireless HDMI

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November 25, 2008 By Marshal M. Rosenthal

Wireless HD has long been the dream of many home entertainment enthusiasts. Looks like that dream is coming true.

The dilemma has hounded many since the advent of flat TVs: hanging the TV on the wall made difficult when you realize you need to run wires from your DVR, DVD, and so on up to the TV. This unsightly jungle of wires certainly ruins the effect of a floating TV.

Sure you could hire a custom installer to run the wires through the wall, but how about going a step further? How about wireless?

Wireless streaming video isn’t new, but it has been wrought with images that stutter, lose sync with the audio, or disappear altogether. Understandably most people wouldn’t put up with this. So companies who have been slow to step in with solutions for standard resolution video are even more wary now when it comes to streaming high-def.

Still, when it comes to having a flat-panel TV up on the wall, there’s no denying the convenience of only having to deal with a power cord, rather than the host of multiple heavy duty AV cables needed for satellite receivers, cable boxes, Blu-ray players, game consoles, etc.

Additionally, this would eliminate situations in which the cabling presents installation problems (such as for apartment dwellers and others who can’t open up walls or ceilings). All of which points to the appeal of being able to transmit video (and audio) wirelessly from a source to the display.

Today there are media bridge devices (such as the AppleTV and others) which can transmit better-than-DVD resolution via a wireless connection. But handling a full high-definition video in real-time seems beyond the WiFi technology they’re using.

However, three companies, Belkin, Gefen and Monster Cable, have products available (or will be available soon) that fulfill the promise of wireless HD in your home. Deciding which one will best meet your high-def needs means looking not just at what the product is, but at the technology that each is using as well.

Belkin FlyWire

Belkin FlywireBelkin’s FlyWire consists of a transmitter and receiver and works with video up to 1080p/30 resolution, including 1080p/24.

Two models are being released—the $999AV69003 is available now, and the $699 R1 will be out early next year.

The difference between the two is that the R1 doesn't transmit IR signals back to the base AV control (more on this later) and the R1 designed for in-room use as opposed to the whole house range of the AV69003.

No images have been released of R1, but expect it to look something like its big brother.

The transmitter portion of the AV69003 is small and unobtrusive enough to sit on a tabletop or even the floor—physically, it resembles a small DVD player minus the disc tray—with six inputs consisting of 3 HDMI, 2 components and 1 s-video/composite.

Designed with a “plug and play” mentality, you attach a source’s output to the transmitter box.

On the other end, you plug the receiver box to yo...

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